Deus Ex Machina

Be bold and mighty forces will come to your aid

SCHWING! 
My hat is here!

SCHWING!

My hat is here!

1 hour ago

darreninfinity:

beavercop:

melleigh:


This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

god damn



What a brilliant way to display this

darreninfinity:

beavercop:

melleigh:

This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

god damn

What a brilliant way to display this

(Source: bencrowther, via theendisfaraway)

3 hours ago

newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.
Photograph by Ruven Afanador

newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.

Photograph by Ruven Afanador

(Source: newyorker.com, via fuckyeahtarantinofilms)

12 hours ago

chessys:

the most important thing is to believe in yourself and also aliens

fox mulder is that you

(via reginaa-phalange)

14 hours ago

i’m watching the outsiders again why am i doing this to myself

14 hours ago

theunderestimator:

Early everyday bohemian life of Patti Smith, photographed by Judy Linn.

More than 100 black and white photos of young Patti, sometimes surrounded by her lovers at the time Robert Mapplethorpe and Sam Shepard are published in "Patti Smith 1969-1976, Photographs by Judy Linn".

(via sian-valentine)

15 hours ago

“I’m crazy about this City.

Daylight slants like a razor cutting the buildings in half. In the top half I see looking faces and it’s not easy to tell which are people, which the work of stonemasons. Below is shadow where any blasé thing takes place: clarinets and lovemaking, fists and the voices of sorrowful women. A city like this one makes me dream tall and feel in on things. Hep. It’s the bright steel rocking above the shade below that does it. When I look over strips of green grass lining the river, at church steeples and into the cream-and-copper halls of apartment buildings, I’m strong. Alone, yes, but top-notch and indestructible-like the City in 1926 when all the wars are over and there will never be another one. The people down there in the shadow are happy about that. At last, at last, everything’s ahead. The smart ones say so and people listening to them and reading what they write down agree: Here comes the new. Look out.”

Jazz by Toni Morrison (via croptopswift)

(via 52tavistocksquare)

15 hours ago

foxygen’s cosmic vibrations

is amazing

the title is very fitting

19 hours ago